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Days Of Future Passed

Artist: Moody Blues
Label: Deram
Catalog#: DES 18012
Format: Vinyl
Country: United States
Released: 1967-11
Tracklist
A1 The Day Begins 5:45
A2 Dawn: Dawn Is A Feeling 3:50
A3 The Morning: Another Morning 3:40
A4 Lunch Break: Peak Hour 5:21
B1 The Afternoon: Forever Afternoon (Tuesday?) 8:25
B2 Evening: The Sun Set: Twilight Time 6:39
B3 The Night: Nights In White Satin 7:41
Credits

Conductor - Peter Knight
Orchestra - London Festival Orchestra

Notes

US release date April 1968

Strawberry Bricks Entry: 
The Moody Blues were originally an R&B-inspired group who scored a UK No. 1 hit in 1964 with "Go Now" b/w "It's Easy Child." A few years later they recruited John Lodge and Justin Hayward, but it took a change to the Deram label and the purchase of a Mellotron before they'd find success again. To quote the liner notes from the album Days Of Future Passed, "The Moody Blues have at last done what many others have dreamed of and talked about: they have extended the range of pop music ...where it becomes one with the world of the classics." Rich cinematic productions were already a studio treatment du jour, yet the Moody Blues were attempting something more—let's call it symphonic rock. A dubious distinction, it reflects another tenant that would weigh heavy on prog rock: the attempt at musical respectability. Dropping the needle, the record plays out: lush orchestral accompaniments provide segue between songs, while a god-like voice recites poetry. Pretentious, of course, but one thing is certain: this isn't really rock ‘n' roll. Ultimately, the Moody Blues wrote pop tunes, thoroughly rooted in a 60s aesthetic. The second side cranks up the Mellotron and fares better, culminating in the classic "Nights in White Satin." It's a great song, and along with "Tuesday Afternoon (Forever Afternoon)," both rightly became classic tracks and FM radio staples. Moreover, the album's immaculate production is impressive for any era. So whatever the content, the right accoutrements could mean everything when speaking progressive. The album sold well, reaching No. 23 in the UK and No. 3 in the US. The Moody Blues would repeat this formula to continual success over the ensuing years. They took a rest in 1973, only to return at the end of the decade for more chart-climbing success.
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