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If Only For A Moment

Artist: Blossom Toes
Label: Marmalade, Marmalade
Catalog#: 608010, 608 010
Format: Vinyl
Country: UK
Released: 1969-07
Tracklist
A1 Peace Loving Man 4:53
  Notes:

Written-By - Brian Godding

A2 Kiss Of Confusion 4:44
  Notes:

Written-By - Brian Godding

A3 Listen To The Silence 4:55
  Notes:

Written-By - Jim Cregan

A4 Love Bomb 6:34
  Notes:

Written-By - Brian Godding

B1 Billy Boo The Gunman 7:07
  Notes:

Written-By - Brian Godding

B2 Indian Summer 5:54
  Notes:

Written-By - Jim Cregan

B3 Just Above My Hobby Horse's Head 3:52
  Notes:

Written-By - Richie Havens

B4 Wait A Minute 5:48
  Notes:

Written-By - Jim Cregan

Credits

Acoustic Guitar [12-string], Sitar - Shawn Phillips
Backing Vocals [Bass Vocal Harmony] - Giorgio Gomelsky
Bass Guitar - Brian Belshaw
Congas - Barry Reeves
Design [Sleeve Design] - Paragon Publicity
Drums - Poli Palmer
Drums, Percussion - Barry Reeves
Lead Guitar, Rhythm Guitar - Jim Cregan
Lead Guitar, Rhythm Guitar, Piano, Organ - Brian Godding
Producer - Blossom Toes
Producer - Giorgio Gomelsky
Producer [Assistant] - Reg King
Vocals - Brian Belshaw
Vocals - Brian Godding
Vocals - Jim Cregan

Notes

Released on a white/orange/pink Marmalade label.
First cat.nr. on label, second on back cover and spine.

Strawberry Bricks Entry: 
Compared to their first record, the Blossom Toes sound like a completely different band on If Only For A Moment, offering a much heavier sound. While firmly planted in the underground sound of London's late 60s, there's obviously some influence from California's acid rock, especially with their lyrical themes. The opening track, "Peace Loving zMan," is a bit of a lark, sounding more like what Gong (another Giorgio Gomelsky-managed band) would later record than anything previously known as Blossom Toes. On "Kiss Of Confusion," guitarists Jim Cregan and Brian Godding offer the "dual lead" approach later popularized by Wishbone Ash. Featuring precise guitar interplay, the duo is all about dynamics. One moment light and airy, the next bursting with emotion, Blossom Toes know how to work a riff inside and out. "Listen to the Silence" and "Love Bomb" follow suit. Musically, "Bill Boo the Gunman" isn't far from Family's oeuvre. The deft drum work of Barry Reeves and the melodic bass of Brian Belshaw underpin Cregan's and Godding's guitars. "Indian Summer" features a lovely chorus, while Richie Havens's "Just above My Hobby Horse's Head" swings over sitar and Belshaw's deep tenor. In late 1969, the band was involved in a car crash following a gig at Bristol University, bringing the group to an abrupt end. Godding and Belshaw would reunite in 1971 with Kevin Westlake for an album under the odd name of B.B. Blunder (Brian and Brian's Blunder tape). Worker's Playground carries on the Blossom Toes tradition, and features Julie Driscoll on guest vocals. Godding would later guest with Magma, but eventually turn to a career in session work. Cregan joined Family after brief spell with John Weider in Stud, and later became Rod Stewart's musical director, co-penning many of the star's hits.
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