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Trilogy

Artist: Emerson, Lake & Palmer
Label: Cotillion
Catalog#: SD 9903
Format: Vinyl
Country: United States
Released: 1972-07
Tracklist
A1 The Endless Enigma (Part 1) 6:37
  Notes:

Written-By - Greg Lake
Written-By - Keith Emerson

A2 The Fugue 1:57
  Notes:

Written-By - Keith Emerson

A3 The Endless Enigma (Part 2) 2:00
  Notes:

Written-By - Greg Lake
Written-By - Keith Emerson

A4 From The Beginning 4:14
  Notes:

Written-By - Greg Lake

A5 The Sherriff 3:22
  Notes:

Written-By - Greg Lake
Written-By - Keith Emerson

A6 Hoedown 3:48
  Notes:

Arranged By - Carl Palmer
Arranged By - Greg Lake
Arranged By - Keith Emerson
Written-By - Aaron Copland
Written-By - Carl Palmer

B1 Trilogy 8:54
  Notes:

Written-By - Greg Lake
Written-By - Keith Emerson

B2 Living Sin 3:11
  Notes:

Written-By - Carl Palmer
Written-By - Greg Lake
Written-By - Keith Emerson

B3 Abaddon's Bolero 8:13
  Notes:

Written-By - Keith Emerson

Credits

Arranged By - Emerson, Lake & Palmer
Engineer [Production] - Eddy Offord
Organ [Hammond C3], Piano [Steinway], Other [Zoukra], Synthesizer [Moog Iii C], Synthesizer [Mini Moog Model D] - Keith Emerson
Other [Tinting By] - Phil Crennelf
Percussion - Carl Palmer
Photography, Artwork By - Hipgnosis
Producer - Greg Lake
Vocals, Bass, Guitar [Electric], Acoustic Guitar - Greg Lake

Strawberry Bricks Entry: 
Recorded during late 1971 and early 1972 between tours of the US and UK, Trilogy marks the third studio album from the trio of Emerson, Lake & Palmer. The album opens with one of their greatest compositions, "The Endless Enigma." Anchored by Greg Lake's bass, the fantastic interplay between Keith Emerson's blaring Hammond organ and Carl Palmer's spry drum work is economical, but also crisp and precise. Lake's lyrics are succinct and his double-tracked vocal delivery right on the mark. On the interning "The Fugue," his bass provides counterpoint to the melody of Emerson's solo piano, though the rest of the band return for the final refrain of "Part Two." Subdued electric guitar and synthesizer solos complement Lake's exceptionally bright guitar on the compulsory acoustic number "From the Beginning;" the song saw some chart action as a single in the US, hitting the lower reaches of the Top 40. Perhaps the time ELP spent in America had some influence on the band's choice of material, as the Wild West seemed to provide inspiration for the next two tracks. The indulgent but genuine rocker "The Sheriff" begins with a roll around the drum kit from Palmer, while "Hoedown" sports an effective arrangement of Aaron Copeland's "Rodeo." The overly romantic "Trilogy" opens, but changes gear swiftly, highlighting Emerson's multitracked keyboards. "Living Sin" is a welcome and hard-rocking throwback; while the circular motion of "Abaddon's Bolero," which slowly builds with each successive repetition of its main theme, relies so much on multitracking that it couldn't be performed live. Eddie Offord's production throughout is impeccable, but it's the sheer diversity of the album's compositions that renders it one of ELP's—and the entire prog rock genre's—most enduring works. The album reached the Top 5 on both sides of the Atlantic. The photograph of the band inside the album's gatefold was taken in Epping Forest.
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