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Latest news: The third edition of The Strawberry Bricks Guide To Progressive Rock has been published! The book is available for individual purchase through your country's Amazon website, including local shipping and Prime benefits: Amazon.com (US) | Amazon.co.uk (UK) | Amazon.ca (CA) | Amazon.de (DE) | Amazon.fr (FR) | Amazon.es (ES) | Amazon.it (IT) | Amazon.jp (JP)

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Reviews for the Third Edition

Reviews for the third edition of The Strawberry Bricks Guide to Progressive rock (will be updated).

"Each of the over 500 entries is lovingly annotated with insightful breakdowns of each subject, which resulted in me reacquainting myself with many albums I hadn't thought about in years. Whether you are the novice getting your cape dirty for the first time, or a seasoned veteran who enjoys a fresh perspective, this is your mountain to climb." - Eric Reidelberger, Ugly Things Magazine

Mr. Fantasy > Traffic

Artist: Traffic
Label: United Artists Records
Catalog#: UAS 6651
Format: Vinyl
Country: United States
Released: 1967-12
Strawberry Bricks Entry: 
Steve Winwood was known for his blue-eyed soul with the Spencer Davis Group, and songs such as "Gimme Some Lovin'" and "I'm a Man" were the last in a string of hits from the group. By 1967, Winwood was out on his own, engaging some friends from his native Birmingham to form Traffic. They retired to the proverbial "cottage in the country" and created the first of two records that, along with Pink Floyd and The Jimi Hendrix Experience, would best characterize Britain's answer to America's acid rock: psychedelic rock. Their debut album, Mr.

Days Of Future Passed > Moody Blues, The

Artist: Moody Blues
Label: Deram
Catalog#: DES 18012
Format: Vinyl
Country: United States
Released: 1967-11
Strawberry Bricks Entry: 
The Moody Blues were originally an R&B-inspired group who scored a UK No. 1 hit in 1964 with "Go Now" b/w "It's Easy Child." A couple years later they-drummer Graeme Edge, keyboardist Mike Pinder and flautist Ray Thomas-recruited bassist John Lodge and guitarist Justin Hayward, but it took a change to the Deram label and the purchase of a Mellotron before they’d find success again.

Procol Harum > Procol Harum

Artist: Procol Harum
Label: Deram
Catalog#: DES 18008
Format: Vinyl
Country: United States
Released: 1967-09
Strawberry Bricks Entry: 
The members of Procol Harum suffered most of the 60s as The Paramounts, whose minor claim to fame was a cover of "Poison Ivy" that hit the UK Top 40 in 1963. They finally broke up in 1966, but by the following year had resurrected themselves as Procol Harum. Released in May, their first single "A Whiter Shade of Pale" b/w "Lime Street Blues" shot immediately to No. 1 in the UK, selling over 4 million copies.

The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn > Pink Floyd

Artist: Pink Floyd
Label: Tower
Catalog#: ST 5093
Format: Vinyl
Country: United States
Released: 1967-08
Strawberry Bricks Entry: 
In late 1966, London-ordained "swinging" by Time magazine-was undergoing a massive cultural change. At the very heart of London's underground lay Barry Miles and Indica Books, the subject of The Beatles' "Paperback Writer." Along with John Hopkins, American Jim Haynes and others, Miles also launched the International Times, London's first newspaper dedicated to this new counter-culture. And it was roughly here that managers Peter Jenner and Andrew King introduced the Pink Floyd Sound to that scene.

Fragile > Yes

Artist: Yes
Label: Atlantic
Catalog#: SD 7211
Format: Vinyl
Country: United States
Released: 1972-01
Strawberry Bricks Entry: 
Prior to recording their fourth album, Yes went through yet another personnel change: Tony Kaye was given the axe in favor of London's hottest keyboard player at the time. Rick Wakeman, who had just finished a musically unceremonious stretch with the Strawbs, was a Royal College of Music dropout, best known inside the studios (and pubs) of London. Yes offered him the opportunity to flaunt his talent, on the pretext that an infusion of more diverse keyboard sounds would further their music. It did indeed.
Reviews: 
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